Once completed, the 6.5MW solar scheme at ABP’s Port of Hull will more than double the Humber Ports’ renewable energy generation, increasing it to over 12MW, which will supply almost 29% of the ports’ energy requirement.

solar panels

The panels will comprise the Humber’s largest roof mounted solar scheme. Image: ABP

 

Simon Bird, director of ABP Humber, said: “This solar installation is another vital step toward making our energy supply even more sustainable and even greener. It will make more use of the hybridised port equipment we have invested in to carry out port operations.

“I’m excited to see where this green energy revolution can take us as a port operator, as we look to decarbonise further our own operations and, in turn, those of our customers and the wider supply chain.”

July 2020 goal

The panels, which will comprise the Humber’s largest roof mounted solar scheme, are being installed by Custom Solar and will cover ABP warehouses and the engineering workshops at the Port of Hull. As warehouses are completed, they will be switched on, with the entire installation set to be online and producing clean power by July 2020.

Once installed, the solar panels will save 2,600t of CO2e per annum, equating to the energy needs of 1,600 average UK homes. And upon decommissioning, the solar panels and the frames in which they sit are 100% recyclable.

Matthew Brailsford, managing director at Custom Solar, which worked with DNO Northern Powergrid in addition to ABP, said the project took over two years to plan due to its complexity.

Currently, installations at the Ports of Immingham and Goole produce 4.5 MW and 1.1 MW respectively.

SOURCE: Greenport

by & filed under Project news, Results.

 

The DocksTheFuture Project aims at defining the vision for the ports of the future in 2030, covering all specific issues that could define this concept. From the work performed in WP1 the essential concepts of a port of the future emerge (Section 4 Ports of the future defined on page 29).

This report is the deliverable D1.5 Port of the Future concepts, topics and projects – draft for experts validation of work package 1 “Port of the Future”: definition of the concept. It is the combination of the following reports:

D.1 Desktop analysis of the concept including EU policies (Section 6.2 on page 40); A long list of over 347 inputs, that is projects, studies, white papers and the like, was established based upon the feedback of all project partners, and the subcontractors Lloyds’s register, TU Delft and Association des Villes Portuaires (AIVP). From this list, 78 inputs have been assessed. To perform the desktop study and information model (Section 9.1.1.1 on page 176) has been defined that is also very useful for the work of the next work packages and beyond the DocksTheFuture project;

D1.2 Stakeholders consultation proceedings (Section 6.3 on page109); A consultation of private and public stakeholders reveals their focus on sustainability and digitalization and digital transformation;

D1.3 Maritime traffic analysis and forecast review – Key Results (Section 6.4 on page 122);

D1.4 Analysis of macro-trends and perspectives (Section 6.5 on page 149). Amongst the most important trends affecting the ports of the future are the climate change, the use of alternative fuel, the growing population and urbanisation, introduction of new technologies, shift of trade to non-OECD countries, and the increase of public debt.

This document will be reviewed by experts during a thematic workshop (Section 6.6 on page 157) to become the final deliverable of work package 1: “Port of the Future concepts, topics and projects – consolidated versions. It will then serve as the basis for the next work packages of DocksTheFuture.

 

A port of the future must be customer focused, in which customer covers both society, public entities and private companies. If we define sustainability as people, profit and planet (3P) then it covers most if not the full scope of the Port of the Future.
     1. Much input deals with the people aspect both on safety, education, (re-)training and assistance in helping other port regions to become pools of economic activity, embedded in local communities;
   2. While sometimes a negative connotation is given to profit, this aspect is of extreme importance to keep the sustainability drive going. Profit is not only to be considered from a business perspective, but also relates to port’s contribution to society, as they often make use of tax payers’ money. Profit is also quoted as invoking a mental shift among port authorities towards polluter pays principles and installing new revenue models that finance the huge investment costs of among others digitization;
    3. Planet goes without saying. Ports are to grow with green, not against green. The analysis performed here shows a huge amount of good, economically viable solutions that often trigger new streams of cargo and created new clusters in the wider region of the port.

For the full report of this Deliverable, please click HERE

by & filed under Events, Project news.

ITS World Congress Singapore is themed Smart Mobility, Empowering Cities, 26th Intelligent Transport Systems World Congress, the world’s leading transport technology congress, will arrive at the shores of Singapore from 21 – 25 October 2019, with 10,000+ Participants | 300+ Exhibitors | 20+ Technical Tours and Demonstrations.

 

DELEGATE PROFILE

 

To find more about this event, please click here

 

At the session of the Session on port-city relation, Alexio Picco from Circle s.p.a presented Docks The Future project, with focus on the main goal of the project which is “To define the Port of the Future, meant as a near future (2030) ” which should face challenges related to but not  limited to: simplification and digitalization of processes, emission reduction, energy transition, the use of renewable, & electrification, smart grids, dredging, port-city interface, and etc.

Then he continued with the introduction of the project partner, project assets, specific sub-contractors, and the platforms of dissemination the DTF news.  Later he continued with the  Identify appropriate KPIs (“Key Performance Indicators”) and relevant monitoring and evaluation actions Leading to the “Port of the Future Road Map for 2030” that will include a number of exploitation elements such as: tools for evaluation and transferability of Port of the Future solutions, R&D and policy recommendations, training packages and the creation of a “Port of the Future Network of Excellence”. It also mentioned that To connect the concept of Future Ports
with the UN Sustainable Development Goals by 2030, 5 Macro area, with their 36 related-Strategic Objectives were defined within the project work package.2.

It also was added that in 2017, AIVP started collaborating with Port Expertise under the broader framework of the European Project Docks the Future.  A survey was done in 2018, to understand the priorities of port-city actors, by asking their leaders or top managers. To do the survey, AIVP invited 3500 organizations worldwide, of which 224 responded to the call.

The survey has 68 questions, structured in five key topics, considering relevant for port‐city relationships: spatial organization, environment, society and culture, economy
and governance.  Briefly the results of the survey mentioned as per below:

  • Despite the sectorial differences, and tension that may emerge among port and city actors, the survey demonstrates that there is considerable common ground in the main issues like waterfront organization, port expansion, energy or mobility.
  • The cooperative approach is reflected in other answers in the survey, to develop hybrid waterfronts, preparing the local economy to answer to global companies, cooperate to finance projects or develop the port‐city interface to reduce the port nuances.
  • The concern to reduce port externalities was visible in several questions, indicating that port city actors, and mostly port authorities, are increasingly aware of the problem.
  •  Mobility was considered an important problem for spatial organization in port cities, where there is the added challenge of port generated traffic, either by cargo or passenger.
  • Circular economy was considered the last priority regarding economic issues, protecting biodiversity was not among the top‐3 environmental issues, while participatory processes were also the last priority among governance concerns.
  • The ISPS has been used countless times in conferences and meetings as the main obstacle for accessibility to port areas and the fences and controls, and reduce the transparency of port areas.

In the end, it was concluded that the survey shows port – city actors recognize the importance of several key topics such as Sustainability, energy transition, circular economy, or protecting biodiversity emphasized, but still the Economic focus of ports remains dominant, not recognizing these new issues as top priorities.

 

by & filed under Events, Project news, Senza categoria.

EU/IMO Global Project Drives Energy Efficiency in the Maritime Sector

 

 

IMO Briefing: 23 17/10/2019

A global network of maritime technology cooperation centers has completed an impressive array of pilot projects over the past three years, helping to drive forward the changes which are required to reduce GHG emissions from shipping.

Five regional Maritime Technology Cooperation Centres (MTCCs) have been established under the Global Maritime Technology Cooperation Centres (GMN) Project, which is funded by the European Union and implemented by the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the United Nations specialized agency with a remit to develop and adopt standards for safer, greener and more sustainable shipping.   Between them, the MTCCs count 97 participating countries and have been working with 1,179 participating vessels to deliver sets of data which can help inform and support energy efficiency improvement. Port energy audits and retrofitting of domestic vessels for better energy efficiency are just two ways in which results are already being seen.

More than 160 people from 64 countries recently met for the third annual GMN conference, held together with World Maritime University (WMU) at the University’s premises in Malmö, Sweden (8-10 October).

During the conference, representatives from the five MTCCs reported on their pilot projects which assess a range of measures to help cut emissions in the maritime sector. These range from data collection in accordance with IMO MARPOL requirements, to assessing the impact of local improvements in ports, to reducing emissions in port areas.  “There is no silver bullet to decarbonise shipping – a basket of measures is needed ranging from framework conditions, standards and innovation to funding and economic incentives,” said Ms. Petra Doubkova, Policy Officer of DG MOVE, European Commission.    As well as pilot projects, each MTCC is involved in hosting and arranging regional and national workshops and seminars, to raise awareness of IMO’s energy efficiency measures for ships and to deliver capacity building through training.   

Future action

The GMN project is continuing, through the MTCCs, to work with local stakeholders and push forward with raising awareness of energy efficiency in the maritime sector. The MTCCS is perfectly poised to continue to implement measures locally and regionally, in order to meet the challenges which action on climate change demands, in line with the Paris Agreement.  

IMO has adopted its own initial IMO strategy on reduction of GHG emissions from ships, which envisages a reduction of CO2 emissions per unit of transport work, the so-called carbon intensity, as an average across international shipping, of at least 40% by 2030  – and, at the same time, pursuing efforts towards a 70% reduction by 2050, compared to 2008. It also envisages a reduction of total annual GHG emissions of at least 50% by 2050 compared to 2008, aiming to phase them out as soon as possible. The role of MTCCs is specifically captured in the IMO Initial Strategy.

“If international shipping is to achieve at least 50% reduction by 2050, what this really means is an average 85% emissions reduction per ship,” said Edmund Hughes, Head, Air Pollution and Energy Efficiency, IMO. “The MTCCs are looking into technical and operational measures for energy efficiency – and this is why the MTCCs are so important, and we commend them.”

About the GMN project

The GMN project is funded by the European Union and implemented by the International Maritime Organization (IMO).   

The project was born out of a concept to develop a global network of maritime technology cooperation centres to accelerate capacity building and technology transfer in the maritime field. This idea was mooted in September 2015 during the inaugural Future-Ready Shipping Conference, a joint IMO-Singapore international conference on maritime technology transfer and capacity building.

Four years on, and thanks to a €10 million funding contribution from the European Union, the GMN project has come into fruition and five MTCCs have been established and have, to date, involved more than 2,210 participants in more than 50 maritime energy efficiency workshops, as well as delivering on pilot projects. They are MTCC Africa; MTCC Asia; MTCC Caribbean; MTCC Latin America; and MTCC Pacific. EC funding for the project has now been confirmed until September 2020.

GMN website:  http://gmn.imo.org/

 

Docks The Future (DTF) project presented at the third MTCC GMN Conference 2019

 

 DocksTheFuture is an EU  H2020 project with a focus on the Energy and Climate macro area of the Project. He started with the main goal of the project which is To define the Port of the Future, meant as a near future (2030) which should face Challenges related to but not limited to: simplification and digitalization of processes, emission reduction, energy transition, the use of renewable, & electrification, smart grids, dredging, port-city interface, and etc.

Then continued with the introduction of the project partner, project assets, specific sub-contractors, and the platforms of dissemination the DTF news.  Later he continued with the  Identify appropriate KPIs (“Key Performance Indicators”) and relevant monitoring and evaluation actions Leading to the “Port of the Future Road Map for 2030” that will include a number of exploitation elements such as tools for evaluation and transferability of Port of the Future solutions, R&D and policy recommendations, training packages and the creation of a “Port of the Future Network of Excellence”.

 

It also mentioned that To connect the concept of Future Ports with the UN Sustainable Development Goals by 2030, 5 Macro area, with their 36 related-Strategic Objectives were defined within the project work package.2.

It also added that in 2017, AIVP started collaborating with Port Expertise under the broader framework of the European Project Docks the Future.  A survey was done in 2018, to understand the priorities of port-city actors, by asking their leaders or top managers. To do the survey, AIVP invited 3500 organizations worldwide, of which 224 responded to the call.

The survey has 68 questions, structured in five key topics, considering relevant for port‐city relationships: spatial organization, environment, society and culture, economy and governance.  Briefly the results of the survey mentioned as per below:

  • Despite the sectorial differences, and tension that may emerge among port and city actors, the survey demonstrates that there is considerable common ground in the main issues like waterfront organization, port expansion, energy or mobility.
  • The cooperative approach is reflected in other answers in the survey, to develop hybrid waterfronts, preparing the local economy to answer to global companies, cooperate to finance projects or develop the port‐city interface to reduce the port nuances.
  • The concern to reduce port externalities was visible in several questions, indicating that port city actors, and mostly port authorities, are increasingly aware of the problem.
  •  Mobility was considered an important problem for spatial organization in port cities, where there is the added challenge of port generated traffic, either by cargo or passenger.
  • Circular economy was considered the last priority regarding economic issues, protecting biodiversity was not among the top‐3 environmental issues, while participatory processes were also the last priority among governance concerns.
  • The ISPS has been used countless times in conferences and meetings as the main obstacle for accessibility to port areas and the fences and controls, and reduce the transparency of port areas.

In the end, it was concluded that the survey shows port city actors recognize the importance of several key topics such As Sustainability, energy transition, circular economy, or protecting biodiversity emphasized, but still the Economic focus of ports remains dominant, not recognizing these new issues as top priorities.

by & filed under Events, Project news.

BiLOG is an agreement signed by La Spezia Port Authority and Municipality of Piacenza in order to create a special event on sustainable, connected and resilient topics with a European spin. The Forum will focus on regional and European dimensions, on the transport and maritime investments, highlighting the importance of cohesion between the players of the logistics chain.  For more information about BiLOG, please click here: https://www.bilog.it/

During the two days of the event , the Programme sessions were held as in:

• Maritime and logistics facing the 2030 trends
• The Container market and its challenges
• The new TEN-T Regulation and the CEF 2 opportunities
• Connected ports and logistics
• La Spezia port system and the role on the Santo Stefano Dry ports
• Sustainability and circular economy: the Bio LNG case
• Rail last mile and e-logistic
• Blue Growth
• Port of the Future

Within the last session, four European H2020 initiatives to raise the environmental of the ports presented: COLEARIS, PIXEL, PortForward, and  Docks The Future .presented.

       

       

 DocksTheFuture presented with the main goal of the project which is: To define the Port of the Future, meant as a near future (2030) which should face Challenges related to but not limited to: simplification and digitalization of processes, emission reduction, energy transition, the use of renewable, & electrification, smart grids, dredging, port-city interface, and etc.

Then continued with the introduction of the project partner, project assets, specific sub-contractors, and the platforms of dissemination the DTF news.  Later he continued with the  Identify appropriate KPIs (“Key Performance Indicators”) and relevant monitoring and evaluation actions Leading to the “Port of the Future Road Map for 2030” that will include a number of exploitation elements such as: tools for evaluation and transferability of Port of the Future solutions, R&D and policy recommendations, training packages and the creation of a “Port of the Future Network of Excellence”. It also mentioned that To connect the concept of Future Ports
with the UN Sustainable Development Goals by 2030, 5 Macro area, with their 36 related-Strategic Objectives were defined within the project work package.2.

It aslo added that in 2017, AIVP started collaborating with Port Expertise under the broader framework of the European Project Docks the Future.  A survey was done in 2018 , to understand the priorities of port-city actors, by asking their leaders or top managers. To do the survey, AIVP invited 3500 organizations worldwide, of which 224 responded to the call.

The survey has 68 questions, structured in five key topics, considering relevant for port‐city relationships: spatial organization, environment, society and culture, economy
and governance.  Briefly the results of the survey mentioned as per below:

  • Despite the sectorial differences, and tension that may emerge among port and city actors, the survey demonstrates that there is considerable common ground in the main issues like waterfront organization, port expansion, energy or mobility.
  • The cooperative approach is reflected in other answers in the survey, to develop hybrid waterfronts, preparing the local economy to answer to global companies, cooperate to finance projects or develop the port‐city interface to reduce the port nuances.
  • The concern to reduce port externalities was visible in several questions, indicating that port city actors, and mostly port authorities, are increasingly aware of the problem.
  •  Mobility was considered an important problem for spatial organization in port cities, where there is the added challenge of port generated traffic, either by cargo or passenger.
  • Circular economy was considered the last priority regarding economic issues, protecting biodiversity was not among the top‐3 environmental issues, while participatory processes were also the last priority among governance concerns.
  • The ISPS has been used countless times in conferences and meetings as the main obstacle for accessibility to port areas and the fences and controls, and reduce the transparency of port areas.

At the end , it was concluded that the survey shows port city actors recognize the importance of several key topics such As Sustainability, energy transition, circular economy, or protecting biodiversity emphasized, but still the Economic focus of ports remains dominant, not recognizing these new issues as top priorities.

BILOG 2019 – The sustainable, connected and resilient road to 2030 – European and Regional perspectives.

 


The Forum will analyze both the regional and European dimension, giving the possibility to improve the knowledge about EU Transport Policy and EU investments on transport and maritime sector, highlighting the importance of the cohesion between all the players of the logistics chain. In the wake of the first event, the second appointment with BiLOG will be held in La Spezia on  October 16th and 17th 2019 at the LaSpeziaExpò exhibition complex.

Also this year, the idea is to organize an event that starts from the most local needs to reach the comparison with the different European realities. Thus a panel was conceived that included all the different needs of the maritime and logistics world. The theme of the event is well described by the three components chosen to define its title and which represent focal points for the development of trans-European transport networks: sustainability, resilience, and connection. The forum will analyze both the regional and European dimension, giving the possibility to improve the knowledge of the EU Transport Policy and of the EU investments in the transport and maritime sector, underlining the importance of cohesion between all the players of the logistics chain.

MAIN TOPICS of this year edition:

Below you can find the event programme:

 

DRAFT AGENDA

Wednesday, 16 October 2019
09h30 – 17h45
Opening Session: Maritime and logistics facing the 2030 trends 

Welcome speech by Carla Roncallo, President of La Spezia-Marina di Carrara Port Authority, by the President of the Region, by the Mayor of the City of La Spezia and by Patrizia Barbieri, Mayor of  the City of Piacenza 
Key note speech: Iveta Radičová the EU Coordinator for the Mediterranean Corridor

Container and logistic market challenges
•    Alessandro Panaro – SRM
•    Daniele Testi – La Spezia Container Terminal
•    Tarros, mediterranean logistics solutions – Danilo Ricci – Tarros
•    Relevance and future developments of the Piacenza logistics sector in the Italian context – Andrea Bardi – ITL

Round Table: Looking to the maritime and shipping sector in 2030. How to boost competitiveness safeguarding a sustainable and resilient future 
Key note speech: Axel Wenblad – WWF
•    Matteo Gasparato – President of UIR
•    Stefano Messina – Assarmatori President
•    Zeno D’Agostino – ESPO
•    Christian Colaneri – RFI

WestMed Conference on Blue Growth

Round Table: The new TEN-T Regulation and the CEF 2 opportunities
•    PTSCLASS introduction on Horizon Europe CEF 2
•    Wojtek Sopinski – DG MOVE
•    Jacopo Riccardi – Port area, Logistic, European Project  and Strategic Rail Infrastructures Coordinator

Rail last mile and e-logistics
•    Giancarlo Laguzzi – Fercargo President
•    Digitalisation and TAF TSI – Roberto Toscani – Binary system
•    Giuseppe Acquaro – Terminali Italia
•    TAF TSI extension to e-logisitcs – Lard Deiterling – Hacon
•    I RAIL – Lorena Sáez Carramolino – Fundacion Valencia Port
•    The role of Piacenza for future development of freight transport by rail in northern Italy – Piero Solcà – Hupac

Port Community System – the way forward 
•   Portnet and the International Fast and Secure Trade Lane approach – Tarik Maoouni – Agencie National de Ports – Morocco
•   Port of La Spezia – Federica Montaresi

Thursday, 17 October 2019
09h00 – 17h00
Round Table: La Spezia port system and the role of the Santo Stefano Dry Port

Key note speech: Pablo Hoya – Zaldesa and Europlatform
Presentation on the vision of La Spezia system (which, in addition to Santo Stefano, includes a focus on specific and distinctive skills of the local community, study presentation on employment impacts, enhancement of the National Transportation School, the role of Pontremolese)

•    Local operator delegates:
o    Alessandro Laghezza – Logistics section of Confindustria La Spezia
o    Giorgio Bucchioni – Maritime Agents President
o    Andrea Fontana – Freight Forwarders of La Spezia Port President
•    Giovanni Cassone – Customs Agency Spezia
•    Carla Roncallo – President of La Spezia-Marina di Carrara Port Authority
•    Paolo Sisti – Mayor of Santo Stefano

Enabling a more sustainable Logistics with BioLNG – SoS log 
Introduction: Daniele Testi, President of SOS-LOGistica
•    Dario Cingolani –  Business Development Director – LC3
•    Ugo Peruch – Sustainable Manager – Mutti
•    Gabriele Marin – General Manager – Air Liquide
•    Fabrizio Buffa – Gas Development Dept. Director – Iveco Italia
•    Sergio Renato Caimi – Boards of Directors Councilor – Essenza Agricola

From Smart Ships to Autonomous ships – Atena 
Introduction: Carlo Podenzana Bonvino – President of section liguria-piemonte of ATENA
•    Alessandro Concialini – CEO – Seastema
•    Vincenzo Galati – Performance Engineering Director– Carnival Corporation
•    Matteo Masi – Smart Vessels Business Development Manager – Wärtsilä

Round Table: Connected port and logistics 
•    Marco Marsili – DG TAXUD
•    Andrea Condotta – Digital Transport and Logistic Forum
•    Roeland Van Bockel – FEDERATED
•    Mikael Lind – PortCDM
•    Stephanie Kleine – Ursa Major Project Coordinator

Maritime Lawyers Session

Port of the Future
•    Beatrice D’Auria –  DocksTheFuture
•    Roberto Cinquegrani – PortForward
•    Ignacio Ubeda – Pixel
•    Domenico Lattuca –  Corealis

CLOSING REMARKS  

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Source: ONtheMosWay

In Brussels, Commissioner for Environment, Maritime Affairs and Fisheries Karmenu Vella will host the first ‘Blue Partnership Forum for the Oceans’. The Forum, established under the Ocean Partnership between the EU and China in July 2018, will bring together EU and Chinese stakeholders. They will help shape future actions in the areas covered by the Ocean Partnership, such as ocean governance, a thriving blue economy and sustainable fisheries.

Ahead of the event, Commissioner Vella said:” China and the EU are major ocean players. We should use our joint influence to take the lead globally and ensure the conservation and sustainable use of the oceans. We want our partnership with China to go beyond words and deliver tangible results. ” The Forum will be followed by a high-level dialogue co-chaired by Commissioner Vella and Administrator of State Oceanic Administration of China Hong Wang.

In July 2018, the European Union signed an ocean partnership agreement with China. Two of the world’s largest ocean economies will work together to improve the international governance of the oceans in all its aspects, including by combating illegal fishing and promoting a sustainable blue economy.

Source: ONtheMosWay

Ahead of the European Parliament’s hearings of the commissioners-designate, a coalition of more than 40 European associations and organisations renewed their call for a strong transport budget. While the previous European Parliament and the Council had agreed on a common understanding on the proposal for the Connecting Europe Facility 2021-2027 (CEF II), the budget will be decided by the upcoming negotiations of the Multiannual Financial Framework. The European Parliament had demanded an increased budget of €33.51bn (€37.76bn in current prices) for the transport envelope of the Connecting Europe Facility II.

Transport allows people to move, businesses and trade to grow, it enables the completion of the internal market, it enhances tourism and it connects all of Europe. Completing the TEN-T core network by 2030 and at the same time moving towards a truly green, climate neutral, inte­grated and digital transport system requires a large amount of investments and funding.

For these reasons, the coalition calls on the newly elected Members of the European Parliament and the incoming Commissioners to support the demand for an increased transport budget, including the proposed transfer of funds under the Cohesion envelope. The Connecting Europe Facility has proven to be a financial instrument delivering highly added value and will be instrumental in the decarbonisation of the European transport sector.

study, commissioned by the European Sea Ports Organisation investigating the future investment needs of European ports, estimates that European ports face investment needs of around 48 € billion for the period 2018-2027. It also shows that port authorities have only been able to obtain 4 percent of the grant envelope over the last 4 years.

“The transport sector is facing huge challenges in terms of decarbonization and digitalisation. These challenges need to be addressed if we want to continue to ensure the connectivity within Europe and thus the well-functioning of the internal market. European seaports need to invest continuously to remain state-of-the-art and cater for their multifunctional role as gateways to trade, multimodal hubs, nodes of energy and clusters of industry and blue economy. The connecting Europe Facility is instrumental in preparing Europe’s ports for the future”, says ESPO’s Secretary General Isabelle Ryckbost.

The MFF4Transport coalition is representing all transport modes and nodes, infrastructure managers, operators, contractors, local and regional authorities, logistics service providers, shippers, users and equipment suppliers in the maritime, inland waterways, railways, road, cycling, aviation, and intermodal sectors, as well as supporting industries and companies.

Source: ONtheMosWay

by & filed under Port-city relations, Sustainability.

“Of all the challenges ports face – from digitalisation to coping with the new breed of 20,000+ teu ships – environmental regulations and sustainability are perhaps the most significant.”

Read below the contribution of ESPO’s Secretary General, Isabelle Ryckbost, in the September 2019 edition of Dredging and Port Construction.

Related documents


 

Source: ONtheMosWay

by & filed under Bridging R&D and implementation, Environment.

Ports are vital gateways for prosperity and an engine for growth, but they can also have significant negative environmental impact.

Partners from Bulgaria, France, Italy and Germany came together in Hamburg on the 26 th and 27 th of September 2019, to kick-off the Interreg Europe project ‘SMOOTH PORTS – reducing CO 2 emissions in ports’ which sets out to change this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Through the engagement of stakeholders from administration-, port related businesses and logistics businesses along the supply chain, SMOOTH PORTS wants to reduce CO 2 emissions from port-related road traffic. To achieve this, the project wants to improve the
regionally available policy instruments in a holistic manner.

The partners will exchange experiences, effective tools and best practice examples with the focus on topics such as: optimal procedures for the clearance of goods, the utilisation of Information and Communications Technology solutions and the application of alternative
fuels in the port area. The partners will furthermore carry out regional studies and create action plans to foster the implementation of the policy instruments and to contribute to the modernisation and alignment of the policy instruments of the next programming period and
relevant operational programmes.

Various stakeholders joined the project partners on September 27 th for site visits in the Port of Hamburg. The tour took the participants to the locations of the Plant Health Inspection service, the Veterinary and Import Agency, the Principal Customs office and the
Container Terminal Altenwerder. At each of the locations a presentation was held and a first exchange of experience possible. The site visits and presentations were followed by a boat tour through the port. Examples of involved stakeholders: the chamber of commerce,
the association for road transport and logistics, and the business association Port of Hamburg. Each partner will hold regional stakeholder workshops to address various regional aspects of the challenges addressed in the SMOOTH PORTS project.

Interreg Europe supports local and regional governments in developing and delivering better policy by setting the scene for opportunities. Examples for these opportunities are the ‘Policy Learning Platform’ and annual events by the Interreg Europe programme. The desire is to safeguard the investments made by governments and to assure that innovation and application endeavours result in viable and  continuous significance for the society and relevant regions. The SMOOTH PORTS project started in August 2019 and will continue until January 2023.
The implementation phase will be until January 2022. The implementation of the action plans will be monitored during the last 12 months of the project’s lifetime. More information can be found at: www.interregeurope.eu/smoothports.

 

Source: ONtheMosWay