by & filed under Events, Project news, Results.

DockstheFuture partners define the main project outcomes

On Tuesday, 24th of November, Magellan and Circle had the pleasure of organising the Docks the Future – Defining the concept of Port of the Future event with the support of all project partners.  Over 120 participants attended the conference in order to find out more about ports, sustainability and digitalisation guided by speakers from European Commission, two important European ports, sister RIA projects and other port senior experts. Kicked off with a brand new DockstheFuture video animation, the event saw 18 excellent panellists present the Port of the Future concept, the work of DockstheFuture to define the concept and the next steps of the Network of Excellence (NoE).

Sergio Escriba (Innovation and Networks Executive Agency, European Commission), Jose Fernandez Garcia (Directorate-General for Mobility and Transport, European Commission) and Alexio Picco (Circle) opened the event and defined the Port of the Future concept and contextualised the initiative. After the opening speech, Isabelle Ryckbost (European Sea Ports Organisation) tackled EU Green Deal objectives and how European ports are working towards these in several ways. Fernando Liesa (Alliance for Logistics Innovation through Collaboration in Europe, ETP) incorporated the physical internet element in the Port of the Future concept especially focusing on logistics innovation.

Ignacio Lacalle Úbeda (PIXEL-Ports), Margarita Kostovasili (COREALIS) and Stefanos Kokkorikos (PortForward) presented the work of the three RIA sister projects in the context of PortoftheFuture cluster cooperation and the common vision in 2030. In order to deal with disruptive innovations for ports, all three speakers underlined that the Port of the Future must have two key elements strengthened: digitalization and sustainability.

Next, Joris Claeys (PortExpertise), Sönke Maatsch (Institute of Shipping Economics and Logistics), Alessio Tei (University of Genoa,) introduced the smart tools for sustainable ports. These tools include the Transferability Anaylsis (TA) of solutions to a wider range of ports in Europe, the Project Common Index (PCI) and the Decision Support System (DSS). Manuela Flachi (Magellan) concluded the tools showcase presenting the DockstheFuturetraining package created with the goal of transferring the know-how of the three tools for the port community.

Representing the active members of the Network of Excellence, Eva Perez (Port of Valencia), Sara Marques (Portof Leixões, North Portugal), Peter Bresseleers (PortExpertise) and José Sanchéz (The Worldwide Network of Port Cities, AIVP) presented the story of a successful spin off. The panellists underlined the importance of collaboration within the network in order to tackle together future challenges and the delicate relationship between Ports and cities.

The event concluded with a thorough roundtable discussion on cooperation with neighbouring countries where Leonardo Manzari (WestMed Iniative), Eduard Rodes (Escola Europea – Intermodal Transport) and Michele Acciaro (Kühne Logistics University) answered two rounds of questions on sustainability, cooperation with neighbouring countries and their priorities for the near future. Moderator and project coordinator Alexio Picco closed the event highlighting the importance of the Network of Excellence, and continuing the work done through cooperation of the whole port community.

We appreciate the presence of all panelists and attendees that contributed to the success of this event. If you are eager to witness the entire event and presentations, you can see them in the links below:

FINAL AGENDA


PRESENTATIONS

Ports of the Future: setting the scene
ESPO’s Roadmap to implement the European Green Deal – Isabelle Ryckbost, ESPO
Logistics Nodes towards the Physical Internet – Fernando Liesa,
ALICE ETP

Port of the Future cluster cooperation: a common vision in 2030
RIA-CSA cooperation – PIXEL case_- o Ignacio Lacalle Úbeda, Polytechnic University of Valencia
COREALIS – Margarita Kostovasili, ICCS
PortForward – Stefanos Kokkorikos, Core-Innovation

Smart tools for Sustainable Ports
Project Common Index (PCI) – Sönke Maatsch, ISL
Transferability Analysis (TA) – Joris Claeys, PortExpertise
Decision Support System (DSS) – Alessio Tei, University of Genova
DTF Training package – Manuela Flachi, Magellan

Network of Excellence (NoE) – the story of a successful spin off
Port of Valencia, Eva Perez
Port of Leixões, Sara Marques
Port-City Relationships – José Manuel Pagés Sánchez, AIVP

FULL CONFERENCE RECORDING
Watch the recording below and click on the agenda to view each speaker directly.

by & filed under Events, Project news, Results.

Started in January 2018, DocksTheFuture defined the vision of the Port of the Future in 2030 with the main goal to face issues related to the various challenges of the port of tomorrow.

The DocksTheFuture partners will present the project outcomes in a form of a virtual conference in two parts:
1) setting the scene of Port of the Future with project partners and showcasing the three smart tools for smart ports and
2) focus on the DocksTheFuture Network of Excellence with testimonies by innovative European ports.

The conference will be concluded with a round table on cooperation with neighbouring countries.

Download the agenda.

REGISTER HERE.

The Mediterranean Sea is the largest of the semi enclosed European seas: its basin area covers almost 2.6 million km2 , 0.82 % of the world’s ocean surface. Surrounded by 22 countries and territories from Europe, Africa and the Middle East that share a coastline of 46 000 km, it is connected to the Atlantic Ocean through the narrow Strait of Gibraltar, to the Red Sea by the man- made Suez Canal and to the Black Sea via the Bosphorus Strait. The Mediterranean region is home to around 480 million people living across three continents: Africa, Asia and Europe. Often called the ‘cradle of world civilization’, the Mediterranean basin has a long history, and an extremely rich natural and cultural heritage.

It provided an important ancient route for merchants and travelers, allowing for trade and cultural exchange between people in the region. It is still one of the world’s busiest shipping routes: about one third of the world’s total merchant shipping —or ~ 220 000 merchant vessels of more than 100 t —cross the sea each year. In addition, over the last few years Mediterranean ports have begun to compete with one another in the strive to increase their share of traffic. The strongly fluctuating nature of the maritime shipping sector and the increasingly narrow profit margins make this tendency extremely threatening for the future of the Mediterranean Sea.

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The Components of Maritime Transport in the Mediterranean

There are several dimensions of maritime traffic in the Mediterranean, which can be considered on three levels:

• As a ‘maritime route’ that, as such, is one of the world’s major trade routes, through which nearly a third of world trade ‘passes’, from the mouth of the Suez Canal to the Straits of Gibraltar or the Bosporus, from the Atlantic to the Black Sea.

• As a ‘crossroads ‘of continents –European, Asian and African– whose trade is growing with globalisation.

• As a ‘landlocked sea’ through which coastal countries develop their trade.

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Mediterranean Ports’ competences and competitions

The Mediterranean is an especially appropriate area for transport trade. The main global maritime route crosses the Mediterranean Sea from Suez to Gibraltar; one of the centers of the global economy is situated on the Northern shore of the Mediterranean; and the EU is opening its doors to new members. Moreover, emergent economies are located in the Northeast connected with the Black Sea and Africa. They have a potential of development and strong links with European economies through Mediterranean seaports. The optimal routing decision tends to be cargo shipping through hubs, as the hub charge has decreased and its efficiency improved . All of these aspects are catalysts for the growth of the well-defined seaports on the Northern shore, in order to establish a competence between them, to attract and generate new traffic and to develop new harbors on the Southern shore coast.

Harbors like Ceuta, Tangier, Djen-Djen, Bizerte, Damietta or Port Said are a new generation in the Mediterranean and will surely change the map of transport and economy in the South Mediterranean. A clever view will create a similar land bridge with Africa and the Mediterranean Sea, but unfortunately it will still take some decades.

In reality, competence between harbors is not only good for the users of their facilities; but it is also good for the whole logistic line, from inland dry ports to all seaports that have been connected by the logistic lines. We can now begin to talk about competence between logistic lines, which implies alliance between economies and territories, and between modes of transport and harbors. The sustainability of a seaport is nowadays not only in its efficiency but it also lies in the productivity of the whole logistical chain. The relation between Spanish seaports such as Barcelona, Tarragona and Valencia and Italian seaports like Genoa, Livorno, Civitaveccia, Salermo or Palermo, is a very good example of the way short sea shipping can change the aspect of transport whithin the continent. It enhances the necessity of a growth in size and in the same direction between harbors.

As these chains are becoming more complex, more intricate distribution structures are needed to tailor final products in all their facets to the customer’s preferences, as Zhaojian Liu et al.5 pointed in their research. They propose options to introduce an integrated collaborative planning system where producers, retailers and logistic service providers work closely together through the sharing of information about production, sales and logistics.

To this increasing complexity, the transport logistic chain must also add environmental and security aspects that play a very important role in the definition of the whole transport system. It may leave out of the line the seaports that will not adapt their characteristics to international regulation on these matters.

In short words, it can be concluded, that the complexification and changes in international trade have taken place at a very fast velocity at a global scale. The time needed to carry a good from one part of the world to another has declined, and at the same time, transport capacities have considerably grown. A ship can nowadays transport the same amount of cargo as carried by

40 ships 50 years ago, and stays only 3 days in the harbor, in contrast with the 12 days previously needed.

The growth of seaports is not enough to adapt to the accelerated rate of economical growth, but new concepts, such as logistic chains, have to be applied to understand the new relationship between peoples, territories, economies and movement of goods. The relations between the different modes of transport have also changed in the design of a harbor. There is no sustainable harbor without space to connect with a main railway, or with a logistic area inside or close by a natural part of the seaport.

Dry ports are becoming new pieces in the logistic chain, giving new opportunities to inland areas, and connecting harbors that will never be connected by sea, creating new corridors or land bridges between harbors.

The movement of all these amounts of goods, efficiently, in time, safe, and controlled, is impossible without the support of the new communication technologies, in a world where the international trade rules are not always easy.

The Mediterranean Sea transport trade is not an exception but has its own particularities, where many asymmetries are still making differences between territories, and where many considerable changes in the near future will draw new maps of relations between growing economies. Long-term strategies cannot avoid these realities, and have to play with the political uncertainties that remain in the region.

Read more here: https://www.docksthefuture.eu/mediterranean-ports-competences-and-competitions/

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Suez Canal, and the Belt & Road Initiative: the Role of the Mediterranean countries

The BRI and the Chinese development strategy for the future The Chinese Belt & Road Initiative (BRI) is probably the most important investment project worldwide since the Marshall Plan that followed World War 2 in terms of number of countries involved in the project and amount of financial resources devoted to the initiative.

Based on official statements and documents by Chinese officials and agencies, the project aims to implement the following:

1. An inland Silk Road economic belt connecting West China with Europe via Central Asia, Russia and Northeast Europe, as well as with the Indian Ocean through Pakistan. A network of railway lines, highways and pipelines will form the inland economic belt.

2. A maritime Silk Road to connect the South-eastern coastline of China to the Mediterranean Sea through the South China Sea, the Indian Ocean and the Suez Canal.

The project involves investments in port areas and inland logistic and industrial facilities along these maritime routes. The BRI was officially launched by President Xi Jinping in a speech at Nazarbayev University in Astana (Kazakhstan) in September 2013. It originally involved 65 countries11 in Asia, Europe and Africa and will be wholly completed by 2049. According to some estimates, China will spend around $1,000 billion in the next ten years to implement the initiative. The financial resources required would total around $8,000 billion over the entire investment period12. The GDP in these 65 countries considered as a whole represents around 1/3 of the entire world’s GDP and over 60% of the world’s population. Furthermore, since its launch many other countries have expressed interest in the project, by joining the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB)13 or planning and developing transport infrastructures in cooperation with China. In fact, 48 other countries – besides the 65 countries officially involved in the BRI since its launch – have been identified so far. They are likely to become active participants in the project. As of September 2017 China had already signed cooperation agreements with 74 countries14.

The project will probably extend to other areas of the world, involving countries in Oceania and South America as well. Table 7 is a list of European and MENA countries involved in the BRI (in bold type, the countries with shores on the Mediterranean Basin). 43 European countries and 19 countries of the MENA region are involved in the BRI or have shown interest in the project. Among these, there are 22 countries with shores on the Mediterranean Basin, 13 of them are European countries and 9 of them fall within the MENA region.

The growing presence of China in the Mediterranean: economic cooperation and investments The attractiveness of Chinese investments has grown among European countries since the outbreak of the Euro crisis in 2011; over the last decade increasing Chinese investments have taken place in several Mediterranean countries. Take the example of Greece, a country heavily hit by the financial crisis, where the acquisition of the Port of Piraeus by the Chinese shipping company Cosco in 2011 was a major relief for the public budget.

Read more here: https://www.docksthefuture.eu/suez-canal-and-the-belt-road-initiative-the-role-of-the-mediterranean-countries/

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The Mediterranean ports connectivity in the middle of a vast network of trade lanes

Short Sea Shipping (SSS) has been defined by the European Commission (1999): ‘the movement of cargo and passengers by sea between ports situated in geographical Europe or between those ports and ports situated in non-European countries having a coastline on the enclosed seas bordering Europe. Short Sea Shipping includes domestic and international maritime transport, including feeder services, along the coast and to and from the islands, rivers and lakes. The concept of Short Sea Shipping also extends to maritime transport between the Member States of the Union and Norway and Iceland and other States on the Baltic Sea, the Black Sea and the Mediterranean’.

The European Commission has also identified two main SSS regions in Europe: a first region which includes ports located in the North Sea and Baltic Sea; a second region includes the Mediterranean and Black Sea ports. To the first region belong all the main northern European ports, in particular those of the so called ‘northern range’: ports from Le Havre to Hamburg. The second region instead includes Mediterranean and black Sea ports.

The Eastern Mediterranean (around 250 million tonnes) and the Black Sea (around 60 million tonnes) are the regions with the smallest absolute volumes, but they have also been the fastest- growing basins with 3.4% and 3.1% average annual growth between 2010 and 2018, respectively. During the same period, the EU average was 1.9%.2

Five core network corridors start/end in the Western Mediterranean basin. Four corridors (from East to West: Atlantic, North Sea-Mediterranean, Rhine-Alpine, and Scandinavian-Mediterranean) are North-South corridors linking  the different ports of the Western Mediterranean with the European hinterland. The Mediterranean CNC is an exemption: it stretches from the Strait of Gibraltar along the Mediterranean coast to North Italy and on through Slovenia, Croatia and Hungary to the Ukraine.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image.png
Core Network Corridor ports and regular ro-ro services in the Western Mediterranean, 2018, Source: ISL, 20193

Read more here: https://www.docksthefuture.eu/the-mediterranean-ports-connectivity-in-the-middle-of-a-vast-network-of-trade-lanes/

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Future professional profiles in Mediterranean Ports

In 2019,  a survey  on  the  most requested professional profiles  in Mediterranean ports was conducted  by  MEDports  Association’s  Employment,  Training  and  Maritime  Expertise (ETME) Committee.  The survey was answered by  14 ports and 50 trainees from the Arab Academy of Science, Technology and Maritime Transport (Egypt). The survey identified profiles needed in ports in four main areas: port management, IT, environment and city port, port construction and security and safety.

The ETME Committee decided in its meeting on April 15th  2020 to continue working on this topic focusing on the future professional profiles and areas of expertise not covered by training institutes today.

Seven profiles were highlighted as very relevant by participants. These profiles are not covered or deficiently covered by current training programs. We have worked on the detailed definition of these  profiles  and added  an additional  one  on Onshore-Power-Supply  bearing  in mind the increasing relevance of this topic.

These job profiles will be key for the future development of Mediterranean ports and they will contribute greatly to their efficiency and competitiveness in a changing environment. The adaptation by ports to new market requirements is a key element for ports’ success and their contribution to the society which may be threatened by the lack of the required training.

Therefore,  we strongly invite training institutions to develop a comprehensive training offer in order to cover the needs of job profiles of the future in Mediterranean Port Authorities. Specific training  modules  will have  to be designed for  each member  of  the  teams  supporting  the positions described below which belong mostly to managerial positions:

Big Data Analyst
Cybersecurity Manager
Manager of Sincromodality and Intermodal Networks
Cold Supply Chain Expert
Energy Transition Manager
Onshore-Power-Supply Manager
Circular Economy Manager

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Impacts of COVID19 on Ports and Maritime Transport in Mediterranean Region[1]

Around 80 percent of global trade is transported by commercial shipping and intra- mediterranean maritime trade flows account for nearly 25% of global traffic volume.

The maritime industry is playing an essential role in the short-term emergency response to the COVID-19, by facilitating transport of vital commodities and products. Despite the current difficult times, a vast majority of ports have succeeded to stay open to cargo operations. However, most of them still remain closed to passenger traffic. Mid and long-term recovery will need to further enhance sustainability and resilience of the maritime transport sector as a whole, for sustaining jobs, international trade, and global economy, as much as possible.

In view of the disruption generated by the COVID-19 pandemic on the maritime networks, the Union for Mediterranean and the MEDports Association co-hosted a webinar with key sectorial partners to discuss how to enhance sustainability and resilience of ports and maritime transport in the Mediterranean region during and after the pandemic.

The Mediterranean Sea has been a critical maritime and commercial route for millennia and today. It is home to 87 ports of various sizes and strengths, serving local, regional and international markets. The COVID-19 pandemic has showcased the vulnerability of maritime networks, port efficiency, and hinterland connectivity in the Mediterranean to crisis situations. As a vital enabler of smooth functioning of international supply chains, the maritime industry should focus on building sustainability and resilience, including to ecological disasters and pandemics like COVID-19, as well as enhancing efficiency and operations, to remain viable and competitive on the global market.

It was concluded that, with due regard to the protection of public health, ports must remain fully operational with all regular services in place, guaranteeing complete functionality of supply chains. Governments were called upon to support shipping, ports and transport operators in favour of best practices. Participants reiterated that the maritime transportation system will only be sustainable as long as it provides safe, efficient and reliable transport of goods across the world, while minimizing pollution, maximizing energy efficiency and ensuring resource conservation. It was underlined that, in the maritime sector, resilience means that ports, and the organizations that depend on ports, can adapt to changing conditions and, when disruptions occur, they can recover quickly and resume business stronger than before. Furthermore, it was noted that the COVID-19 pandemic could represent an opportunity for the maritime industry to change the way the industry operates so as to effectively contribute to broader systemic resilience.


[1] https://ufmsecretariat.org/impacts-covid-ports-maritime-transport-mediterranean/

The Mediterranean is an especially appropriate area for transport trade. The main global maritime route crosses the Mediterranean Sea from Suez to Gibraltar; one of the centers of the global economy is situated on the Northern shore of the Mediterranean; and the EU is opening its doors to new members. Moreover, emergent economies are located in the Northeast connected with the Black Sea and Africa. They have a potential of development and strong links with European economies through Mediterranean seaports. The optimal routing decision tends to be cargo shipping through hubs, as the hub charge has decreased and its efficiency improved . All of these aspects are catalysts for the growth of the well-defined seaports on the Northern shore, in order to establish a competence between them, to attract and generate new traffic and to develop new harbors on the Southern shore coast.

Harbors like Ceuta, Tangier, Djen-Djen, Bizerte, Damietta or Port Said are a new generation in the Mediterranean and will surely change the map of transport and economy in the South Mediterranean. A clever view will create a similar land bridge with Africa and the Mediterranean Sea, but unfortunately it will still take some decades.

In reality, competence between harbors is not only good for the users of their facilities; but it is also good for the whole logistic line, from inland dry ports to all seaports that have been connected by the logistic lines. We can now begin to talk about competence between logistic lines, which implies alliance between economies and territories, and between modes of transport and harbors. The sustainability of a seaport is nowadays not only in its efficiency but it also lies in the productivity of the whole logistical chain. The relation between Spanish seaports such as Barcelona, Tarragona and Valencia and Italian seaports like Genoa, Livorno, Civitaveccia, Salermo or Palermo, is a very good example of the way short sea shipping can change the aspect of transport whithin the continent. It enhances the necessity of a growth in size and in the same direction between harbors.

As these chains are becoming more complex, more intricate distribution structures are needed to tailor final products in all their facets to the customer’s preferences, as Zhaojian Liu et al.5 pointed in their research. They propose options to introduce an integrated collaborative planning system where producers, retailers and logistic service providers work closely together through the sharing of information about production, sales and logistics.

To this increasing complexity, the transport logistic chain must also add environmental and security aspects that play a very important role in the definition of the whole transport system. It may leave out of the line the seaports that will not adapt their characteristics to international regulation on these matters.

In short words, it can be concluded, that the complexification and changes in international trade have taken place at a very fast velocity at a global scale. The time needed to carry a good from one part of the world to another has declined, and at the same time, transport capacities have considerably grown. A ship can nowadays transport the same amount of cargo as carried by

40 ships 50 years ago, and stays only 3 days in the harbor, in contrast with the 12 days previously needed.

The growth of seaports is not enough to adapt to the accelerated rate of economical growth, but new concepts, such as logistic chains, have to be applied to understand the new relationship between peoples, territories, economies and movement of goods. The relations between the different modes of transport have also changed in the design of a harbor. There is no sustainable harbor without space to connect with a main railway, or with a logistic area inside or close by a natural part of the seaport.

Dry ports are becoming new pieces in the logistic chain, giving new opportunities to inland areas, and connecting harbors that will never be connected by sea, creating new corridors or land bridges between harbors.

The movement of all these amounts of goods, efficiently, in time, safe, and controlled, is impossible without the support of the new communication technologies, in a world where the international trade rules are not always easy.

The Mediterranean Sea transport trade is not an exception but has its own particularities, where many asymmetries are still making differences between territories, and where many considerable changes in the near future will draw new maps of relations between growing economies. Long-term strategies cannot avoid these realities, and have to play with the political uncertainties that remain in the region.

Western Mediterranean – Competition Pushes Expansion

Located on the Moroccan side of the Straits of Gibraltar, the Port of Tanger Med is two ports in one, located on the crossroads of north–south and east–west maritime routes, which together carry about 20 percent of global trade. Is the largest port in North Africa and soon may be the premier port for the entire Mediterranean Sea. With the June opening of APMT’s $800 million Tangier Med 2 Extension, the port arguably now has the largest container capacity (TEUs) in the Mediterranean and is positioning itself to become a key transhipment hub for Maersk Line and its alliance partners. The Tangier Med 2 has two new container terminals – TC3 and TC4 – with an additional 6 million TEU capacity.

Port Said, Egypt and Tangier Med, Morocco are the leading African ports in the Mediterranean region; Tangier Med recorded the world’s highest absolute increase in its index during the first decade of its operations since 2007. Both Port Said and Tangier Med provide extensive trans- shipment services, benefiting from their geographical position and private sector investments from major global port operators

The Spanish Port of Valencia is the largest in the Mediterranean (although Piraeus is positioned to overtake them this year), tallying over 5 million TEUs in 2018. Valencia’s strategy is to be one of the ‘last’ three ports for ocean carriers to and from Europe – one of the essential transhipment hubs for transiting ocean carriers – but the port’s operating at near full capacity. So, to keep up

with port competition from Tangier Med and now Piraeus, Valencia is embarking on building a fourth container terminal.

In 2018 the Port of Algeciras, located on the Spanish side of the Strait of Gibraltar, handled 4.77 million TEUs in 2018. The Port consists of two main facilities: the APM Terminals Algeciras and Total Terminal International Algeciras. The Algeciras can handle 18,000 TEU boxships but is looking to upgrade the port’s facility. Recently the Port Authority of Algeciras (APBA) announced it would invest 233 million euros ($259 million) over the next four years with 62 million euros ($69 million) coming in 2020. Perhaps the most important items in the plan is increasing the draft of the Juan Carlos I dock from 17 meters to 18.5 meters and the construction of new roads and esplanades to meet the demand for ro/ro traffic in the port, as well as the acquisition of a new container scanner, within the Container Security Initiative (CSI).

Northern Mediterranean Ports

The northern Mediterranean ports like Spain’s Barcelona, France’s Marseille or the Italian ports of Genoa and La Spezia are integrated into the European hinterland through rail and road networks. For the most part, container volumes have continued to rise. For example, the Spanish Port of Barcelona tallied just over 3.4 million TEUs in 2018 compared to just about 3 million in 2017. And the French Port of Marseille-FOS was over 1.4 million TEUs comparted to 1.36 million in 2017. The Italian Port of La Spezia also posted an increase, improving to 1.54 million TEUs in 2018 from 1.47 million TEUs a year earlier. The only port to post a decline was the Italian Port of Genoa (Savano- Vado) which notched 2.6 million TEUs down from 2.62 million in 2017. In the case of Genoa some of the reduced tally was the result of the August 14, 2018 collapse of the Morandi Bridge in Genoa– a main connector for the port.The bridge was successfully completed in the spring of 2020 and is to be set to open to traffic in July of 2020

Many ports in the world, including the port of Limassol in Cyprus, seek to become accredited transhipment hubs. This means that large shipments from other Mediterranean and Black Sea countries could be consolidated and sent to Cyprus, from where they could be efficiently distributed to various nearby ports, e.g. in Egypt, and other countries in the Middle East, using smaller vessels and SSS operations. To be a successful transshipment hub, a port should be able to plan its operations precisely and ensure relevant information are available to visiting ships.

The role of Cyprus as an international shipping centre was established about 55 years ago. Cyprus has managed to attract shipping companies due to its excellent maritime infrastructure, and a high level of expertise, particularly in the fields of surveying, ship brokering and maritime insurance. Today, the Cyprus Registry is classified as the 22nd  largest merchant fleet globally and the 3rd largest fleet in the European Union, with approximately 900 ocean going vessels of a gross tonnage exceeding 49 million tons3. It is estimated that approximately 4% of the world’s fleet and around 20% of global third party ship management activities are controlled from Cyprus. For the companies established in Cyprus, around 87% are controlled by Cypriot and EU interests4. The island’s ports have developed purpose-built container terminals and Cyprus is one of the first countries of the Eastern Mediterranean to use specialized gantry cranes. Moreover, the island is now considered one of the most important cruise centers and transportation hubs in the region.

The Cypriot Government’s vision is to develop initiatives that will further expand Cyprus’s role as a communication bridge between the European Union and the countries of Middle East, such as Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon. In addition, the interest of major shipping organizations in using hub ports in the region has increased the need for upgrading the infrastructure and for providing more cost- efficient service.

Transhipment Hubs

The Mediterranean has nine major transhipment hubs but two stand out because of their central location, the island of Malta’s Marsaxlokk port and Gioa Tauro in Southern Italy. Both are located in the central Mediterranean – a crossroads of major trade lanes. Marsaxlokk posted 3.3 million TEUs in 2018 up over the 3.1 million a year earlier. Conversely, Gioa Tauro lost ground, tallying 2.3 million TEUs in 2018 from 2.45 million TEUs in 2017.

Despite their enviable locations, both transhipment hubs are facing challenges. Back in May, Malta Freeport announced that Maersk and MSC plan to reduce their operations at Freeport, relocating to Tanger Med and to Egypt’s Port Said. The terminal operator said the move might cut their business by up to 35%. While Maersk is expected to retain a presence and other carriers are poised to increase, the move illustrates the tenuous existence of hub ports without a major cargo catchment area attached.

In April, Gio Tauro became 100% controlled by the MSC Group as Contship Italia sold its stake to TIL – MSC’s terminal arm. MSC said it would invest 120 million euros ($133 million) for new equipment and capital works to help boost the annual throughput to 4 m TEUs within two years.While the ports of Marsaxlokk and Gioa Tauro are fighting to retain market share, the Greek Port of Piraeus has emerged as one of the Med’s key hubs. (7)

In 2018 Piraeus hit 4.9 million TEUs up nearly 900,000 from 2017. The key to the port’s turnaround was the investment by COSCO. In 2016 COSCO Shipping acquired a 51% stake in Piraeus Port Authority PPA. Under the COSCO aegis the port authority fortunes have flourished. Profits for the first half of 2019 were up by about 20% compared to the same period in 2018. And under the terms of the agreement should COSCO invest at least $330 million in the port by 2022, it will be eligible to up its stake by another 16%.

Recently, Greece’s Port Planning and Development Committee granted approval of an investment master plan submitted by PPA which would open the way for $670 million in infrastructure upgrades at the port. Although a proposed new 4th container terminal was not approved by the committee, the issue is not dead. The goal of the PPA is to bring the TEU capacity from the existing 7 million TEUs to 10 million TEUs – potentially making it the largest box port in the Mediterranean.

The BRI and the Chinese development strategy for the future The Chinese Belt & Road Initiative (BRI) is probably the most important investment project worldwide since the Marshall Plan that followed World War 2 in terms of number of countries involved in the project and amount of financial resources devoted to the initiative.

Based on official statements and documents by Chinese officials and agencies, the project aims to implement the following:

1. An inland Silk Road economic belt connecting West China with Europe via Central Asia, Russia and Northeast Europe, as well as with the Indian Ocean through Pakistan. A network of railway lines, highways and pipelines will form the inland economic belt.

2. A maritime Silk Road to connect the South-eastern coastline of China to the Mediterranean Sea through the South China Sea, the Indian Ocean and the Suez Canal.

The project involves investments in port areas and inland logistic and industrial facilities along these maritime routes. The BRI was officially launched by President Xi Jinping in a speech at Nazarbayev University in Astana (Kazakhstan) in September 2013. It originally involved 65 countries11 in Asia, Europe and Africa and will be wholly completed by 2049. According to some estimates, China will spend around $1,000 billion in the next ten years to implement the initiative. The financial resources required would total around $8,000 billion over the entire investment period12. The GDP in these 65 countries considered as a whole represents around 1/3 of the entire world’s GDP and over 60% of the world’s population. Furthermore, since its launch many other countries have expressed interest in the project, by joining the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB)13 or planning and developing transport infrastructures in cooperation with China. In fact, 48 other countries – besides the 65 countries officially involved in the BRI since its launch – have been identified so far. They are likely to become active participants in the project. As of September 2017 China had already signed cooperation agreements with 74 countries14.

The project will probably extend to other areas of the world, involving countries in Oceania and South America as well. Table 7 is a list of European and MENA countries involved in the BRI (in bold type, the countries with shores on the Mediterranean Basin). 43 European countries and 19 countries of the MENA region are involved in the BRI or have shown interest in the project. Among these, there are 22 countries with shores on the Mediterranean Basin, 13 of them are European countries and 9 of them fall within the MENA region.

The growing presence of China in the Mediterranean: economic cooperation and investments The attractiveness of Chinese investments has grown among European countries since the outbreak of the Euro crisis in 2011; over the last decade increasing Chinese investments have taken place in several Mediterranean countries. Take the example of Greece, a country heavily hit by the financial crisis, where the acquisition of the Port of Piraeus by the Chinese shipping company Cosco in 2011 was a major relief for the public budget.

Intense competition between Mediterranean countries for attracting Chinese investments has emerged in recent years. In response to the Chinese maritime strategy of investing in several port infrastructures in the Mediterranean Basin, the Med countries on both the northern and the southern shore of the Basin are promoting themselves as a priority gate for inland countries and territories. The increase of ship size of the main container carriers has had a significant impact on global maritime routes. In fact, not all Mediterranean ports are equipped to accommodate 19k to

21k TEUs ships and few of them can offer the required level of logistic efficiency and connection. Moreover, in the view of Chinese authorities the presence of industrial zones, logistic facilities and tax-free areas serving port infrastructures can play a very important role in boosting the efficiency of the maritime industry and thus they are considered as positive factors by investors. On the south- eastern shore of the Mediterranean, Turkey has received significant funds to improve its infrastructures.

The city of Kars, close to the border with Armenia, is the terminal of the BTK 32 www.srm- maritimeconomy.com (Baku-Tbilisi-Kars), a railway line linking Azerbaijan to Turkey through Georgia. This 838 km long line will shorten the usual route between China and Europe by 7,000 km. Near the Bosporus Strait there are other big infrastructure projects linked to the BRI: the rail tunnel of Mammary and the third bridge over the strait – the Tavuz Sultan Selim Bridge . The Turkish coastline is also a staging post to the Maritime Silk Road. North Africa, thanks to its strategic position between the Middle East and Europe, plays an important role within the BRI project.

The five countries of the area have different strategies concerning economic partnership and alliances within the African continent. While Egypt, Libya and – from last April – Tunisia are part of the COMESA (Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa), Morocco joined the CEDEAO (Economic Community of West African States) in 2018 and Tunisia gained the status of observer member of this organization in November 2017. Algeria, on the other hand, joined the CEMAC (Central African Economic and Monetary Community) a choice consistent with the new Trans- Sahara Highway connecting Lagos in Central Africa to Algiers. The highway may serve as a strategic infrastructure to connect the southern shore of the Mediterranean to Central Africa.

All North African countries are directly involved in the Belt & Road Initiative, even if only Egypt has been part of the project since its launch back in 2013. Their geographic position on the southern shore of the Mediterranean in an asset for investors in ports and logistic facilities in the framework of the maritime silk road. Following the “string of pearl” strategy for the maritime silk road, Chinese investors have planned to take control of a series of port infrastructures along the maritime route from southeast China to the Mediterranean through the Indian Ocean and Suez.

Complementarities between the Chinese strategy underlying the BRI project and North African countries are rather evident:

• Following the strengthening of commercial ties between China and Europe – which is among the main purposes of the BRI – the economies of the southern Mediterranean can play an active role within the supply and value chains that will be created.

• One of the priorities for Chinese authorities is to secure the energy needs of the country in  the  coming  years,  considering  the  expected  sharp  increase  of  China’s  energy    consumption. As it will be pointed out further on in this chapter, China focuses its energy strategy on the Middle East, and specifically on Persian Gulf countries, while investments in North Africa are mainly directed to the RES project.

 • North African countries greatly need improved infrastructures to fuel their economic development and solve the strong imbalances between coastal areas and inland regions: this is a strategic issue for countries like Tunisia and Egypt where the lack of financial resources can open the way for Chinese investors; China, for its part, can use its overcapacity in the domestic building sector for infrastructure projects in Northern Africa.

Its geographic position Marocco– between Europe and West Africa, the Mediterranean Basin and the Atlantic Ocean – is strategic. The port of Tangier Med can serve as a regional hub for both Western Europe and Western Africa. The trade agreements Morocco has signed with 55 countries, in particular with European countries and the US, represent another strong point of the Kingdom of which China can take advantage. Morocco is also the greatest investor in West Africa and the city of Casablanca has become the most important financial hub of the whole continent. As regards transport infrastructures, the port system of Tangier Med – which includes a free zone and a series of industrial parks and logistic facilities – can boast maritime connections with more than 170 ports and 70 countries worldwide.

Economic cooperation between China and Morocco has recently improved: in May 2016 a strategic partnership was signed with 15 agreements between the two countries; on 17th November 2017

Morocco officially joined the BRI project. Following the II China-Africa Investment Forum that took

place in Marrakesh in November 2017, Morocco and China signed a cooperation agreement for two  economic  projects:  “Tangier  Tech  City”  –  aimed  at building  an  environmentally  friendly industrial city in the area of Tangier Med – and an electric transport system to be realized in Morocco by Chinese company “BYD Auto industry”.

Egypt is the biggest country in North Africa with a population of almost 100 million inhabitants, a figure higher than the rest of North African countries combined. The country lies in an enviable geographic position between the Mediterranean Basin, the Red Sea and the Middle East and, above all, it controls the Suez Canal, a strategic chokepoint between the Indian Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. In the framework of the Egyptian strategic view “Vision 2030”, the Government proceeded in the direction of improving the business climate of the Country through a series of legislative interventions: in November 2016 Egypt decided to allow its currency (the Egyptian Pound) to float freely on the currency market; in June 2017 the new law of investment came into force; last April the Government announced plans to cut fuel and electricity subsides respectively by 19% and 48%.

All these measures aim to attract foreign investors for infrastructural projects in the country. Chinese company China Harbor Engineering Company Ltd will cooperate with Egyptian companies in the construction of new logistic and industrial areas along the Suez Canal. On the occasion of the visit of President Xi Jingping to Egypt in January 2016 the two countries signed 21 partnership agreements with a total value of $15 billion. The Chinese company “China State Construction Engineering Corporation” will cooperate to the construction of the new administrative capital 45 km east of Cairo, a project valued at $45 billion.

In summary, following the Suez Canal enlargement, Egypt plans to take on the role of industrial and logistic platform for Chinese investments in the framework of the Belt & Road. A short list of Chinese investment in some MENA countries (excluding Morocco and Egypt) can be seen in the figure below.

by & filed under Events, Project news, Results.

Started in January 2018, – DocksTheFuture defined the vision of the Port of the Future in 2030 with the main goal to face issues related to the various challenges of the port of tomorrow.


The DocksTheFuture partners will present the project outcomes in a form of a virtual conference to take place in the afternoon of 24 November 2020 from 14:00 – 17:30.


The event will roll out in two parts:

  1. setting the scene of Port of the Future with project partners and showcasing the three smart tools for smart ports and
  2. focus on the DocksTheFuture Network of Excellence with testimonies by innovative European ports

The conference will be concluded with a round table on cooperation with neighbouring countries. 

Mark your agendas, the draft agenda and more information on registration will follow soon!

CIRCLE: on October, 26th Connecting EU Insights, the 4-day virtual event dedicated to the shipping industry and its transition towards the Green New Deal, is off to start.


Digitalisation, Evolutive Customs Corridors, integration of the Supply Chain, Smart Terminals, A.I., but also Arctic Route, Hydrogen e Wind Propulsion are among the main issues of the digital event organized by Connecting EU,
Business Unit of CIRCLE Group, scheduled to take place from 26-29 October. Keynote speakers will be Professor Carlo Secchi, Atlantic Corridor Coordinator, and Kurt Bodewig, Motorways of the Sea Coordinator, with two dedicated interviews respectively on 27th and 28th October. Lastly, on 29th October two conferences will present the evolution of European projects Vamp Up and E-Bridge – with the presence of Paolo Emilio Signorini, President of Western Ligurian Sea Port Authority and Pawel Wojciechowski, Coordinator for the Rhine-Alpine Corridor – and the Network of Excellence, which brings together the most innovative ports and case histories in Europe.

CIRCLE Group, specialized in the analysis and development of automation and digitalization solutions for the port and intermodal logistics sectors headed by Circle S.p.A. – parent company listed on the AIM Italia market organized and managed by  Borsa Italiana – communicates the start of Connecting EU Insights, the 4 day virtual event dedicated to the shipping industry and its transition towards the Green New Deal and related challenges.
Fully digital and in English language, the event has been conceived and organized by Connecting EU, the Business Unit of CIRCLE Group which supports Public Entities and Companies by identifying their positioning at European level (EU Branding) and funding opportunities (Project Anticipation).
Connecting EU Insights is off to start on Monday, October 26th and will take place until Thursday 29th October with a rich program of digital conferences and interviews entirely available for free. Many are the leading companies and organisations involved: Central Adriatic Sea Port Authority System, Western Ligurian Sea Port Authority System, Eastern Ligurian Sea Port Authority System, Center-North Tyrrhenian Sea Port Authority System, Italian Customs and Monopolies Agency, Assiterminal, European Commission, Fincantieri, Fundacion Valenciaport, Grimaldi Group, Hyperion, IMDO, INEA, International Windship Association, Laghezza, LCA Law Firm, Italian Minister of Infrastructures and Transports, Port of Barcelona, Porto do Ystad, Propeller Club of Antwerp, Regione Liguria, RINA, Smart Green Shipping Alliance, Snam, SRM – Centro Studi Gruppo Intesa Sanpaolo, Bocconi University and University of Turku. Digitalisation, Evolutive Customs Corridors, integration of the Supply Chain, Smart Terminals, A.I., but also Arctic Route (this last will be the subject of a specific event with the scientific partnership of SRM – Centro Studi Gruppo Intesa Sanpaolo), Hydrogen e Wind Propulsion are among the main issues of the digital event organized by Connecting EU, Business Unit of CIRCLE Group, and scheduled to take place from 26-29 October.
Keynote speakers will be Professor Carlo Secchi, Atlantic Corridor Coordinator, and Kurt Bodewig, Motorways of the Sea Coordinator, with two dedicated interviews respectively on 27th and 28th October.  “Futuro e portualità: be smart, go digital” will be then the title of an event sponsored by LCA Law Firm and scheduled for Tuesday 27th October. Lastly, on 29th October two conferences will present the evolution of European projects Vamp Up and E-Bridge, with the presence of Paolo Emilio Signorini, President of Western Ligurian Sea System Port Authority and Pawel Wojciechowski, Coordinator for the Rhine-Alpine Corridor, and the Network of Excellence, which brings together the most innovative ports and case histories in Europe.
The Chairman of Connecting EU Insights will be Alexio Picco, EU Funding Expert and Managing Director at CIRCLE Group.

All events, in chronological order:

Evolutive Customs Corridors: AI and digitalisation for sustainability, port efficiency and cargo security
26 Oct | 12:00 p.m. – 01:30 p.m.
Panelists:
Astrid Schlewing, Digital Transport and Logistics Forum – DG MOVE
Frank Janssens, Consultant on Trade Facilitation, Customs Digitalisation and Single Window establishment
Matteo Paroli, Managing Director – Central Adriatic Ports Authority
Danilo Bottone, Head of Organisation, Research and Digital Transition Office – Organisation and Digital Transition Directorate, Italian Customs and Monopolies Agency
Andrea Lagomarsini, CTO, Senior Software Architect and Developer – Hyperion

Is Hydrogen the new LNG?
26 Oct | 05:00 p.m. – 06:30 p.m.
Panelists:
Cosma Panzacchi, EVP BU Hydrogen – Snam
Stefano Socci, Executive Vice President Transport & Infrastructure Consulting &Design – RINA
Josep Sanz-Argent, R&D – Energy Transition – Fundación Valenciaport
Massimo Debenedetti, Vice President Research & Innovation – Fincantieri S.p.A.

Arctic Route: challenges and opportunities
27 Oct | 08:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Scientific Partner SRM – Centro Studi Gruppo Intesa Sanpaolo
Panelists:
Mark Scheerlinck, President – Propeller Club – Port of Antwerp
Alessandro Panaro, Head of maritime & mediterranean economy dept. – SRM – Centro Studi Gruppo Intesa Sanpaolo
Tomi Solakivi, Asst. Professor (Tenure Track), Maritime Business & Policy Operations & Supply Chain Management -Turku School of Economics at the University of Turku
Markku Mylly, CEO – MyNavix

Infrastructural enhancement and increase of land and port capacity to connect
Mediterranean ports
27 Oct | 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Panelists:
Francesco Maria di Majo, President of the Center-North Tyrrhenian Sea Port Authority System
Carles Rúa Costa, Responsible for strategic projects and innovation at Port of Barcelona
Kyprianou Paul, External Relations Manager at Grimaldi Group
Elena Jenaro, Project Manager at INEA

Futuro e portualità: be smart, go digital Sponsorship LCA Studio Legale
27 Oct
Panelists:
Davide Magnolia, Partner LCA Studio Legale
Gianluca De Cristofaro, Partner LCA Studio Legale
Alessandro Laghezza, CEO Laghezza
Federica Montaresi, Head of Special Projects, Innovation and Institutional Relations Port Authority of the Eastern Ligurian Sea*
Alessandro Ferrari, Direttore Assiterminal

Interview with the Coordinator: Carlo Secchi, Atlantic Corridor Coordinator
27 Oct | 5:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Interview with the Coordinator: Kurt Bodewig, Motorways of the Sea Coordinator
28 Oct | 12:00 p.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Wind Propulsion: the next big thing
28 Oct | 2:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Panelists:
Gavin Allwright, Secretary International Windship Association (IWSA)
Diane Gilpin, Founder & CEO of Smart Green Shipping Alliance

Intermodality, Digitisation & Green Tech: the EU pathway of the Ports of Genoa.
Vamp Up & E-Bridge EU Projects
29 Oct | 09:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Panelists:
Paolo Emilio Signorini, President – Port Authority of the Western Ligurian Sea
Paweł Wojciechowski, Coordinator for the Rhine-Alpine Corridor
Representative from MIT*
Julian Espina, Project Manager – INEA
Oliviero Baccelli, Academic Fellow of Università Bocconi – PTSCLAS
Alberto Pozzobon, Marketing Manager – Port Authority of the Western Ligurian Sea
Luca Abatello, CEO – Circle Group
Francesca Moglia, EU Policy Office – Port Authority of the Western Ligurian Sea
Jacopo Riccardi, European Project Manager – Regione Liguria

Docks the Future presents the Network of Excellence
29 Oct | 04:00 p.m. – 05:00 p.m.
Panelists:
Paul Brewster, Adviser – European Policy, Irish Maritime Development Office
Agneta Nilsson, Senior Manager EU Coordinator – Port of Ystad

* to be confirmed

Agenda and registration here

CIRCLE S.P.A.
Established in Genoa in June 2012, Circle S.p.A. is the company heading the homonymous group, specialized in the analysis and development of automation and digitalization solutions for the port and intermodal logistics sectors. The acquisition, at the end of 2017, of 51% of Info.era guaranteed the strengthening of the related Milos® and Sinfomar® software products, focused on the intermodal logistics sector, inland terminals and port terminals, ports (Port Community System of the Port of Trieste, in the example), as well as to MTOs and maritime agencies. During 2019 Circle is further strengthening the solutions portfolio, in the IOT, Optimization, Digital Twin, Big Data, Process Automation sectors and, in July 2019, Circle has acquired 100% of Progetto Adele, a software house specialized in the development of vertical software systems on the Supply Chain with the two Master SPED and Master TRADE solutions, respectively dedicated to shipping and logistics, and commerce and industry. Furthermore, through the Connecting EU Business Unit, Circle supports Public Entities and Companies by identifying their positioning at European level (EU Branding) and funding opportunities (Project Anticipation). From October 26th, 2018 Circle is listed on the AIM Italia market of Borsa Italiana (alphanumeric code: CIRC; ISIN code for ordinary shares: IT. 0005344996). Circle is an Inno- vative SME.

For further information
Issuer: Circle S.p.A.

Registered office Via Gustavo Fara 28, 20124 Milano
Operational headquarters Via Bombrini 13/3, 16149 Genova
Nicoletta Garzoni, Media & Investor Relations Manager

Mail: press@circletouch.eu
Mobile: +39 339 2367218

IR Top Consulting, Investor & Media Relations – Via Bigli 19, 20121 Milano

Mail: ir@irtop.com
Phone: +39 02 4547 3883/4

Nominated Adviser (NomAd): Integrae SIM S.p.A. – Via Meravigli 13, 20123 Milano

Mail: info@integraesim.it

Docks the Future presents
the Network of Excellence

The Network of Excellence – output of Docks the Future Project –  gathers the most innovative ports willing to team up and take actions to support the maritime community in developing innovative projects and in achieving their sustainable targets, based on the opportunities deriving from funding programmes such as the ones promoted by the Green Deal.AGENDA

Chairman: Alexio Picco, EU Funding Expert and Circle Group Managing Director

Panelists

  • Agneta Nilsson, Senior Manager EU Coordinator, Port of Ystad
  • Paul Brewster, Adviser – European Policy, Irish Maritime Development Office

Click here to Register 


MOSES at a Glance

Ports play a decisive role in the EU’s external and internal trade, as about 74% of imports and exports and 37% of exchanges go through ports. Although ports and especially Deep Sea Shipping (DSS) ports are integral nodes within multimodal logistic flows, Short Sea Shipping (SSS) and inland waterways are not so well integrated.

The aim of MOSES project is to enhance the SSS component of the European supply chain by addressing the vulnerabilities and strains related to the operation of large containerships. A two-fold strategy will be followed, in order to reduce the total time to berth for TEN-T Hub Ports and to stimulate the use of SSS feeder services to small ports that have limited or no infrastructure.

The above-mentioned scope of MOSES project will be reached through the implementation of the following innovations:

  • For the SSS leg an innovative, hybrid electric feeder vessel including robotic cargo handling system (MOSES feeder).
  • For DSS ports the adoption of an autonomous vessel maneuvering and docking scheme (MOSES AutoDock).
  • digital collaboration and matchmaking platform (MOSES platform)

MOSES is an ambitious project that bears significant innovation potential in the context of European SSS uptake. Its innovation potential covers both vessel design aspects as well as software tools and accompanying governance models to improve related logistics processes.


You are invited to complete a questionnaire within the context of the MOSES research project (autoMated vessels and supply chain Optimisation for sustainable short SEShipping) which is funded by the European Union.

It will only take about 15 minutes of your time to complete this questionnaire, which is a part of the project’s user needs and requirements definition phase. You will be asked to assess the importance of several aspects of the MOSES innovations. There is also one open-ended question on each subject so that you can provide more information if you wish to do so.
Before you decide if you want to participate, it is important that you understand the aim of the research, what it involves and your rights as a participant. To ensure that you have a clear understanding of these matters, please carefully read through all the sections of this questionnaire. Please feel free to contact us and ask questions until you are confident that you have received understandable answers before making a decision.

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Please click here to participate in the survey

During this session, we’ll have the pleasure to interview two of the protagonists of the wind propulsion renaissance, who will answer all your questions on this subject, which is more and more discussed among the maritime community.

 Wind assisted propulsion is going to be a reality earlier than we expect in the Med area.

Of course, there are a number of question marks around the topic, for example about:

  • Safety
  • Crew capability
  • Engineering
  • Economic model

Don’t miss the webinar to hear the answers!

Register here



ABOUT CONNECTING EU INSIGHTS | “Connecting EU insights” is a week-long event composed of virtual meetings designed to gain an accurate and deep understanding of pivotal topics for the development of the maritime industry and its green transition. 

Discover more here